Spring Again

Another spring is here – for real, this time. We may get some more snow (likely, actually), but when the pasques are out, spring is really, really here.
IMG_8177eI found these on a little trail in Rapid City just before a piano lesson last week. What a lovely find! There are a few other wildflowers I really get excited about, but pasques are particularly special. They mark the end of a long winter, and the beginning of beautiful weather and the promise of more living, blooming things, and of vivid, rambunctious color coming back to the landscape!

 

Advertisements

Botanicals | Stiffstem Flax

Linum rigidum, or yellow or stiffstem flax, took its rank as a new favorite. Flowers that I rarely see often are the ones to qualify as favorites. It is clearly a relative of its more prolific cousin, wild blue flax, which has long been a favorite of mine – I love how the sunlight lights up the petals along the roadways, turning each blossom into a little blue glimmer on a sunny day. Yellow flax is not nearly as showy, almost disappearing among the array of other bolder yellow flowers this time of year, which is part of what made it so fun to find.
IMG_7582eCreation is so beautifully marked by patterns of similarity and differences. Evidence of a Creative Design behind all of this world.

Botanicals | Breadroot Scurfpea

Pediomelum escelentum, or breadroot scurfpea, is one of those understated and overlooked flowers. The drab green-grey petals and the drab lilac-colored petals are sure easy to miss. But even with its drabness, there is a beauty about it.
IMG_7595eNot all of God’s creation is stunning in its aesthetic. But the uniqueness alone points to a creative God.

Botanicals | Sego Lily

This was a delightful find. I haven’t seen a sego lily in two years, I believe, and was thrilled a couple of afternoons ago to find that one of our meadows was scattered with them. I went back this afternoon to get pictures of these beautiful, strange flowers. Calochorus nuttallii, the sego lily, is one of two very similar species of lily, the other being the Gunnison’s mariposa lily, calochortus gunnissonii.    “And which of you by being anxious can add a single hour to his span of life? And why are you anxious about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin,  yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.” Matthew 6:27-29

Botanicals | Shell-leaf Penstemon

Penstemon grandiflorus, or shell-leaf penstemon, is the largest of the pentstemons, and consequently is easy to spot along the road, where it is blooming profusely this time of year!I love seeing whole hillsides covered with this beauties! I’ve found these photograph best not in full sun, unlike a lot of other flowers, due (I think) to how fleshy their leaves and petals are. While other flowers take on what I like to call a “stained glass effect,” because shell-leaf penstemon has such thick petals, the light doesn’t shine through it well.

Botanicals | White Milkwort

This understated little plant, polygala alba, blends in with the grasses and can be difficult to spot.  I found a few clusters this morning in some open, sparse areas alongside a road. Don’t confuse it with its relative, seneca snakeroot (polygala senega). For a year or so, I had seneca snakeroot identified as white milkwort, until I finally decided both couldn’t be milkwort and needed to just figure it out. Thanks to the book Plants of the Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains, the mystery was solved.